The Bible on Audio

Back in July I started listening to the Bible on audio on my commute. I’ve taken breaks from it to listen to music, but am planning to continue until I’ve finished the whole Bible on CD.
Below I will track my progress.

Listening to Bible on CD (NIV)
Book of the Bible
Completed
Genesis
 X
Exodus
 X
Leviticus
 X
Numbers
 X
Deuteronomy
 X
Joshua
 X
Judges
 X
Ruth
 X
1 Samuel
 X
2 Samuel
 X
1 Kings
 X
2 Kings
 X
1 Chronicles
 X
2 Chronicles
 X
Ezra
 X
Nehemiah
 X
Esther
 X
Job
 X
Psalms
 X
Proverbs
 X
Ecclesiastes
 X
Song of Solomon
 X
Isaiah
 X
Jeremiah
 X
Lamentations
 X
Ezekiel
 X
Daniel
 X
Hosea
 X
Joel
 X
Amos
 X
Obadiah
 X
Jonah
 X
Micah
 X
Nahum
 X
Habakkuk
 X
Zephaniah
 X
Haggai
 X
Zechariah
 X
Malachi
 X
Matthew
 X
Mark
 X
Luke
 X
John
 X
Acts
 X
Romans
 X
1 Corinthians
 X
2 Corinthians
 X
Galatians
 X
Ephesians
 X
Philippians
 X
Colossians
 X
1 Thessalonians
X
2 Thessalonians
X
1 Timothy
X
2 Timothy
X
Titus
X
Philemon
X
Hebrews
X
James
X
1 Peter
X
2 Peter
X
1 John
X
2 John
X
3 John
X
Jude
X
Revelation
X

Plague by H.W. "Buzz" Bernard

I had trouble putting this book down! One of my favorite topics for a novel – biological warfare. A terrorist develops an Ebola virus that is airborne and is set to unleash it in Atlanta. It’s a race against time by the CDC to find and stop him.

Plague

This book kept me turning the pages. The main character Richard Wainwright is asked to be the temporary CEO for BioDawn, a biological research facility. He finds it odd that the reason for him being there is because all the higher-ups of the company were killed together on a plane crash. He begins to look into the company to determine what they do. And runs up against obstacles, including a hit woman threatening his life if he continues to dig into BioDawn.

Meanwhile, some people have gotten sick and died from a strain of Ebola virus that is airborne. The CDC determines this is not accidental but is a test run for a potential huge terrorist attack. They try to determine who is behind this and find and stop him before he can complete his real mission of releasing the deadly Ebola virus into the metro Atlanta area, thus potentially causing a worldwide catastrophe.

For more information on this book and the author, you can check out the virtual tour from Pump Up Your Book.

I thoroughly enjoyed being immersed in this story and the suspense of trying to catch a terrorist before the unimaginable occurs. Highly recommended for those who like suspense.

*I was given a copy of this book free from the publisher.

plague Tour Information:
About the Author:
H. W. “Buzz” Bernard is a writer and retired meteorologist.  His debut novel, Eyewall, which one reviewer called a “perfect summer read,” was released in May 2011 and went on to become a best-seller in Amazon’s Kindle Store.
His second novel, Plague, came out in September 2012.
He’s currently at work on his third novel, Supercell.
Before retiring, Buzz worked at The Weather Channel in Atlanta, Georgia, as a senior meteorologist for 13 years.  Prior to that, he served as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force for over three decades.  He attained the rank of colonel and received, among other awards, the Legion of Merit.
His “airborne” experiences include a mission with the Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunters, air drops over the Arctic Ocean and Turkey, and a stint as a weather officer aboard a Tactical Air Command airborne command post (C-135).
In the past, he’s provided field support to forest fire fighting operations in the Pacific Northwest, spent a summer working on Alaska’s arctic slope, and served two tours in Vietnam.  Various other jobs, both civilian and military, have taken him to Germany, Saudi Arabia and Panama.
He’s a native Oregonian and attended the University of Washington in Seattle where he earned a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric science; he also studied creative writing.
Buzz currently is vice president of the Southeastern Writers Association.  He’s a member of International Thriller Writers, theAtlanta Writers Club and Willamette Writers.
He and his wife Christina live in Roswell, Georgia, along with their fuzzy and sometimes overactive Shih-Tzu, Stormy.

WEBSITE | FACEBOOK | GOODREADS | LINKEDIN

About the Book:
Deep in the secret recesses of a Cold War lab, the Russians created tons of deadly bio-weapons.  Now, decades later, a protege of that Russian research is about to release weaponized Ebola into the heart of the South’s most iconic city: Atlanta, where the symbols of American “decadence” range from a happily diverse population to the Coca-Cola museum and CNN headquarters.
A preliminary test of the horrifying virus demonstrates the unspeakable suffering of its victims–and alerts the Centers for Disease Control that a terrible pandemic is in the making.  CDC Virologist Dr. Dwight Butler begins a frantic effort to track down the source of the virus before it’s too late.
For new BioDawn CEO Richard Wainwright, it quickly becomes clear that the “accidental” plane crash that killed the pharmaceutical company’s entire executive hierarchy may have some connection to the evolving threat.  Suddenly, Richard is being stalked by a hit woman.  He and Butler join forces to find the lone terrorist at the center of a plan that could unleash the Black Plague of the 21st century.

AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE

Book Excerpt:
NORTH METRO ATLANTA, GEORGIA
SUNDAY, AUGUST 18
David Gullison stared into the bathroom mirror, terrified by what he saw. Someone he didn’t know, someone he’d never known. There was something almost demonic about his image. His eyes swam in crimson. Dead rubies. His face, flushed and splotched with tiny scarlet blooms, gave the appearance of Edelweiss gone bad. He looked the caricature of an aged, hard-drinking Irishman. But he knew it wasn’t age or booze. It was much worse than that.
The pain came again, squeezing his gut, wrapping around his chest. It had started suddenly a couple of days ago. At first it was just his back. “Too much golf,” his wife said.
Maybe.”
No maybe. I warned you. Take it easy. You’re retired now.”
Then the fever had come, boiling up inside him like a pyroclastic flow. His throat felt as though a cheese grater had been dragged through it.
The flu,” his wife said. “Go lie down for a while. I’ll get some aspirin.”
Yes,” he said. He’d flopped down on his bed and didn’t move for twelve hours. It was unlike any flu he’d ever had. He felt as if he were on fire, burning up from the inside out. He struggled to take deep breaths; his lungs suffused with fluid. He coughed, deep hacking wheezes that expelled fine sprays of mucus tinged in pink.
The pain spread, invading his stomach and bowels, locking them in vise grips of agony. Vomiting and diarrhea followed. Nonstop.
Now the cramping hit again, sharp, wrenching. He leaned over the sink and vomited once more, long after there shouldn’t have been anything left to bring up. A tarry mixture, black and red, flooded into the basin. It was as if his insides were liquefying, turning to jelly. He gripped the edge of the sink, but had no strength left. The room spun in a dizzying spiral.
He knew he’d waited too long; knew he needed to get to an emergency room. He tried to call for his wife, but before he could, the searing effluent rose in his throat again. He sank to his knees and crawled toward the toilet, but failed to make it in time. A rush of burbling flatulence shot from his bowels. A vile, malodorous slime of blood and dark, stringy tissue ran down his thighs and splattered onto the floor. It oozed over the bathroom tile, staining it with a harbinger of something far worse to come.
He lost consciousness and collapsed into the repulsive emulsion.
Plague Tour Page:

http://www.pumpupyourbook.com/2012/12/08/pump-up-your-book-presents-plague-virtual-book-publicity-tour/

My Church Journey

The whole issue of being part of a local church has been an on-again, off-again issue for me throughout my entire adult life.
Growing up overseas, church involved walking a mile to the local Bengali church where the entire service was in another language that unfortunately I was not fluent in. I was able to participate in the singing, but had to sit through the sermon not understanding what was being said. The missionaries on the compound we lived on organized a Sunday School for the missionary kids to be part of, so that was in English but I don’t remember much about those Sunday School classes. On Sunday evenings, the missionaries would gather at the guest house to have an English service. That was “church” for me growing up. When we were in the States for furlough, we traveled around to all of our supporting churches where I heard my Dad preach the same sermon and hear the same presentation week after week. So my idea of church growing up was not the ideal.
In Kenya, we started a church that was held in English and Swahili. It was hard to follow along since it was broken up, back and forth between the 2 languages. On Sunday evenings, several of the local missionaries would gather together to have a service and that was “church” for me.
I was always required to go to church. Unless I was sick, I had to be part of church. Then I went to a Bible college with a lot of rules, including church attendance. By that point, I was tired of being “forced” to do something that I wanted to make my own choice in. During summers and after graduation, it was a relief to make the choice of whether or not to go to church.
In April/May of 1997, I moved out to Michigan to be closer to Jono, whom I was dating at the time. We started looking for a local church together. It was interesting to see how we each tended to look for different things in a church and trying to find a church that we both liked was not as easy as we thought it would be. We found a church that we both enjoyed only to watch it go through a big split right after we started going there. We ended up connecting more with the people who left and so went with them as they began plans to start a new church. In the process, they visited several local churches and Jono found he wanted to continue at one of the churches we visited.
We got married while attending that church but didn’t stay long after that. Over the course of the next several years we found ourselves church “shopping” and found it difficult to find a church that we both wanted to be part of. We also learned and grew through all this about what is really important in a church and what issues need to be overlooked since no church will be perfect. I often found myself tired of church and the same issues coming up again and again at different churches. I would go through periods of not going to church as a result.
In 2005, we found our current church and have been there ever since. That’s not to say that I still don’t struggle with the whole issue of church. Being an introvert has played a part in this struggle. It’s hard to be part of something that depletes your energy. Yet I also know the importance of being part of the Christian community. The Christian life is not a “lone ranger” life. It must be lived in connection with others. This can be an ongoing battle for me – the importance of being part of a community and the struggle of needing time alone to recharge. I haven’t found the answer yet but continue on in my Christian journey. What does church mean for you? Is it a vital part of your life or something you find yourself struggling with? I know that church is hard for many people, often because of past hurts. Christians hurt each other. Often church is a place of cliques. Or felt to be a bunch of rules that once must conform to in order to belong. Yet I see throughout the Bible, the emphasis on being part of a community, growing with God together, challenging each other to remain strong in the faith. As long as we live in a sinful world, this will be an ongoing challenge that Christians must work through.