This Changes Everything by Jaquelle Crowe

This Changes Everything: How the Gospel Transforms the Teen YearsThis Changes Everything: How the Gospel Transforms the Teen Years by Jaquelle Crowe

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is excellent! It is written by a teenager for teenagers. Now, I am no longer a teenager :-), but I have been getting involved with teenagers and wanted to see if this would be a good resource for them. And yes, it is!
The author delves into how the gospel and following Jesus changes everything about our lives. I was getting convicted in her chapter about how we use our time. She spells out the gospel and then shows how this affects us in various ways, such as community in the church, our time, spiritual disciplines, relationships with others, sin and sanctification. I loved her chapter on disciplines and the importance of memorizing Scripture!
This was a quick read and very impactful. I highly recommend this, not only to teenagers, but to anyone who wants a reminder of why the gospel is important and how it affects our daily living.

*I received a copy of this book free from the publisher Crossway in exchange for my review.

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Biblical Doctrine by John MacArthur

Biblical Doctrine: A Systematic Summary of Bible Truth
The long-awaited, much-anticipated systematic theology by John MacArthur is finally here. Though there are several areas where I disagree with MacArthur theologically, he is a sound Bible teacher and pastor who has remained faithful to the Word of God through the many years of his ministry.

However, as I tried to read this theology book I found myself getting frustrated with the tone and manner in which it is written. The view of the author is put forth as the correct view, matter-of-factly, as if no other view has any validity. Contrary to Grudem’s theology book, which gives the different views within orthodox Christianity, MacArthur’s theology comes across as being the only correct view. I have noticed in past messages by MacArthur that he does not fairly represent opposing views but often uses straw-man arguments. It may well be that he doesn’t understand the opposing view or really thinks that is their view. But his arguments fall flat because he is not accurately teaching what the opposing view actually believes, only a caricature of what he thinks they believe.

I could not continue reading this book with him only giving his view and teaching it as if it is the only way to read and understand the Bible. Many well-respected scholars and theologians down through the centuries would not agree with MacArthur’s interpretations. His view is not the only correct, biblical view. When it comes to salvation and the doctrines that matter (primary issues), we would agree. But on secondary issues, he comes across as his way being correct without any alternative views being allowed for. While I don’t think he actually feels that way, as he has partnered with others such as Sproul, it smacks that way in his book.

For those who hold similar views to MacArthur in secondary issues, you will likely love this book. It is written in an easy-to-read and normal MacArthur manner. But if you believe differently on some of these issues (such as covenant theology, amillenialism, etc.), you may have a hard time stomaching what he writes. Perhaps I may go back and try to finish it in the future, but with so many books out there that I want to read, the rest of this one is going to remain unread for now.

*I received a copy of this book free from the publisher Crossway in exchange for my review.